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Just like any material, screens have affordances. Much like wood, I believe screens have grain: a certain way they’ve grown and matured that describes how they want to be treated. The grain is what gives the material its identity and tells you the best way to use it. Figure out the grain, and you know how to natively design for screens.

And we’ve tried. Oh god, we’ve tried. Unfortunately, the discussion around screen-native design feels a bit stunted in its current form. We’re stuck in a pendulum swing.

Tags: design
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Meetings in organizations surface some of the best and the worst of these habits, all bundled into a complex package. For a troubled team, you’ll be hard pressed to find a better place than a meeting to expose tensions between the actual and advertised culture.

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A UX project plan is your blueprint for how you’re going to conduct UX activities. Not to be confused with the overall project plan (which is usually owned by a project manager or program manager), a UX project plan helps you think about how UX work will integrate with the broader project timeline.

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The problem is that most flat UIs are built with a focus on the provision of content, with transactional components (i.e., forms) receiving very little attention. What happens when flat and forms collide? User experiences can, and often do, suffer.

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An open collection of communication tools used in design processes that deal with complex systems.

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"If you, like me, struggle with terrifying stage-fright, you might try this: as you prepare a presentation, keep a giant post-it in front of you that says, “YOU ARE JUST A UI”."

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Logo Design & The Art of Modifying

Some great tips on how to modify a typeface to make a good, solid logo out of it.

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General advice on public speaking, from Brad Frost.

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"User research works best when you match your participants to the people who will use your designs. It makes sense that teams would try to use the demographics, often compiled by the organization’s market research team, as the basis of their recruiting efforts. However, this can be problematic."

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"First, it’s 45,417 pixels tall. It’s an absurdly long page, yet I was not bothered in the slightest by it. Why? Because page length doesn’t matter when you have a compelling story to tell. People read on the Web. People scroll. The reason why we think they don’t is because they scan before they read. The next time you hear someone say “People don’t read on the Web” you know you’re talking to someone who writes poor content."